French Sheet Slipcovers: Part 2

22 comments:

Ok...on to the details

Over the years, having completed tons upholstery projects 
(which I love to do, in case you hadn't guessed)
I have found the best way to communicate how I want the finished project to look is to give the upholsterer visuals.  
In the case of the couch, in addition to explaining it, I gave them this: 

What I was looking for is a very relaxed slipcover 
with nice details but not too frilly
There are three monograms so I wanted to be sure the seamstress fully understood the placement.  
If they cut up the sheets prematurely with out knowing where the monograms were meant to go
"ouch"
the whole batch of sheets is wasted 

I also washed the sheets twice to be sure they had fully shrunk.  
Linen can shrink big time...so always prewash!

If you are unsure how you want your sofa skirting to look 
here is link to Houzz...there is about 43,000 photos to browse through

And here is a yardage chart to pin or print out if you need
some help knowing how much fabric a project takes
 The best thing about slipcovers is this
My dirty little country girl Millie, likes to rub and ich her back side all down the side of this white couch so you can about imagine the big brown stripe of dirt that appears after a week or so

I wash them and then dry them just  until a bit damp, 
before I pop them back on the couch

Here you can see the embroidered monogram and the cut work along the top of the back

 Every exposed seam got a 1 inch French or flanged welting
This is unusually large but I wanted this to look very hand sewn and loose
 The corners are softly gathered and puddle just a bit.
 I always have my skirting lined so it hangs better.
Now I suppose you could iron these but I really like them this way
 The corners get a little pinched treatment

 Here are the flanged seams along the back which I really love
 One of the monogrammed sheets had a seam and the other did not
 but its all part of the vintage quality of the fabric





you can get so creative with pillows and throws



So there you have it!

Don't forget to stop and see Wendy's lovely fabric 

A bientôt !


22 comments:
  1. Dee-light-full. I couldn't wait for part 2. I pinned that diagram. Learned a lot reading this. Many thanks.

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  2. That flange is so cute and different. Love the look of the slipcovers.

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  3. Do I use the word lovely too much in here...I think I do, but oh those are some very lovely slipcovers!!!

    xo Kat

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  4. No way! This is just too beautiful. Love the monograms, the flange and the whole original look. Only you could have created this!
    Unfortunately, it would look filthy in my house in about 2 hours! Still, these are amazing slipcovers! ~Delores

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  5. Very pretty, and I really love that you accommodate your gorgeous yellow Lab. Dogs are a part of our lives = we embrace slipcovers!

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  6. Flanges! Genius! Actually, I put flanges on my pillows on occasion. I am such a fan of your style! Congratulations on the slipcover masterpiece!

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  7. It's just fabulous Kelley and I love seeing the details close up. Bravo!
    xo~
    T

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  8. Wow that is amazing!! I love them!! I use those French Sheets on my bed and they are so nice and strong and wash up so nicely!!!

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  9. Oh I wish I had your skill! I don't even know anyone I could pay to do this for me. Beautiful!!!!

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  10. Kelly, every corner and detail...love. I have been collecting some linens for a while now to have a slip made for a small love seat I have.
    Can't wait to add just a bit more to my stash to get the gathered look you have so achieved! Sweet Millie!
    Stacey

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    1. Thank you Stacy! Yes , Millie is pretty much my sweet girl ; 0 )
      xo Kelley

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  11. Hi Kelly! great slipcover design and execution.. the flanges, the placement of the initials... especially the very washable nature! lovely inspiration as always...

    coucou

    Kit

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  12. Kelley

    They look fabulous! Millie has much better manners than Beau...I think I need sunbrella awning fabric for him! I am seriously considering it!! Always enjoy seeing Millie make an appearance!

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  13. Kelley...First,I have enjoyed the sense of adventure you spur, whether in the home or the garden...and the light-hearted air you create with your accessorizing.Such good tips, here for giving old linen sheets a new life as slipcovers, and communicating your design to your workroom. As a 1-woman workroom working w/the trade for over 3 decades, (and a real linen enthusiast) here are tips from a maker.

    Pre-shrinking/pressing ~ Yes! Water should be WARM, and don't dry the linen to a crisp. Same when washing the finished slipcover, and pull it from the dryer when still a bit damp. This is the time to put it back on the furniture for the more casual, rumpled look, smoothing and primping it just a bit. For a more tailored look, press when damp, first.

    MY MOST VALUABLE TIP? Find a professional laundry to PRE-wash in WARM, and PRE-PRESS BEFORE TAKING FABRIC TO WORKROOM. If the fabric is not stretched-out and pressed evenly, it will stretch-out during the cutting and sewing phase...a nightmare for the workroom, and will produce stretched-out puckered seams. An old-fashioned mangle ironer is best, run through several times on medium hot. Too many laundries will try to save time with one pass on hot. This will fry your beautiful linen, and lessen it's life.
    A DIY attempt to press/stretch fabric with a home iron will have you at the ironing board (swearing) all day. It just can't be done right w/o pro equipment. You've made an investment in your linens. Spend a bit more to help guarantee a successful end product.

    Also, make sure that your workroom has a walking-foot industrial sewing machine. These feed the fabric evenly during seaming, with what is called a feed-dog to advance the fabric on the bottom, and a pair of "feet" on the top that actually walk, advancing the fabric on the top. If a walking foot is not used when seaming, only the fabric on the bottom will be grabbed. This will create a puckered seam.

    Many workrooms may not trust your measurements, though providing them does not hurt. Many may wish to make a house call to make templates from your furniture, or even request that the piece be at their shop. And yes, photos and drawings and clippings!

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    1. Thank you so much for this wonderful and informative comment! I wish I had all of those useful things like an industrial sewing mating and a mangle iron!

      xo kelley

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  14. I absolutely love this look. I've had white denim slipcovers on my couch for years, and alas, they have finally shrunk to the point that I can no longer zip the side. Mine has one zipper hidden. Honestly, I wonder why. I did pre-wash them too but next time I think I'll have it done at a professional laundry as suggested by Artisanworks in her comments. Anyway, I love your finished product, it's so lovely. Really. And even though I live with three guys and a dog, I'd do the white slipcovers again.

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    1. Hi Leslie, you just can't go wrong with white. Thank goodnes for hot water and bleach!

      cheers, Kelley

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  15. It just can't be done right w/o pro equipment. You've made an investment in your linens. Spend a bit more to help guarantee a successful end product.

    Patio blinds

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